I keep fast food in business.

RSS
fastcompany:

Here’s why Twitter software engineer Buster Benson or Y Combinator founder Paul Graham think that you need to learn to love to toil.
The personal slog
Writing on his always-interesting SVBTLE blog, Benson says there are different modes of work:
Introspection: Finding yourself.
Exploration: Finding everything else.
Goal-making: Based on values found during introspection.
Strategy-making: Hypotheses about how to achieve your goals.
Experimentation: Trying things, playing, iterating.
Finding fit: Person/universe fit.
Slogging: Executing. Doing the work.
Each draws on different moods, states of mind, and brainwaves, Benson says, and we tend to excel at some and suck at others.

These processes don’t happen sequentially; they’re simultaneous. If your workflow is a startup, its organization is flat: Each mode is strongest when the others are strongest, and neglecting one hurts the others.
And it’s the slog that’s getting things done.
An inquiry into human schlepping
Paul Graham is Silicon Valley’s godfather who defines what makes a startup a startup (growth) and what a founder really is: an economic research scientist. Part of that research is schlepping.
“One of the many things we do at Y Combinator is teach hackers about the inevitability of schleps,” he writes in a recent post. “(They) are not merely inevitable, but pretty much what business consists of.”
We don’t like schleps, Graham says, and that dislike provokes an unconscious blindness. We are, unknown to ourselves, pulling away from doing hard stuff (like seeing your friend in Queens).
But because everyone’s scared of the schlep, the toils are doubly valuable.
So keep calm and schlep on.
Here’s the full story.

fastcompany:

Here’s why Twitter software engineer Buster Benson or Y Combinator founder Paul Graham think that you need to learn to love to toil.

The personal slog

Writing on his always-interesting SVBTLE blog, Benson says there are different modes of work:

  1. Introspection: Finding yourself.
  2. Exploration: Finding everything else.
  3. Goal-making: Based on values found during introspection.
  4. Strategy-making: Hypotheses about how to achieve your goals.
  5. Experimentation: Trying things, playing, iterating.
  6. Finding fit: Person/universe fit.
  7. Slogging: Executing. Doing the work.

Each draws on different moods, states of mind, and brainwaves, Benson says, and we tend to excel at some and suck at others.

These processes don’t happen sequentially; they’re simultaneous. If your workflow is a startup, its organization is flat: Each mode is strongest when the others are strongest, and neglecting one hurts the others.

And it’s the slog that’s getting things done.

An inquiry into human schlepping

Paul Graham is Silicon Valley’s godfather who defines what makes a startup a startup (growth) and what a founder really is: an economic research scientist. Part of that research is schlepping.

“One of the many things we do at Y Combinator is teach hackers about the inevitability of schleps,” he writes in a recent post. “(They) are not merely inevitable, but pretty much what business consists of.”

We don’t like schleps, Graham says, and that dislike provokes an unconscious blindness. We are, unknown to ourselves, pulling away from doing hard stuff (like seeing your friend in Queens).

But because everyone’s scared of the schlep, the toils are doubly valuable.

So keep calm and schlep on.

Here’s the full story.

fastcompany:

Four Steps To Reinventing Your Career
When it was Eric Schmidt’s turn, he must have done a pretty good job. His efforts were impressive enough to Google cofounders Larry Page and Sergey Brin to convince them he was the CEO to take their company into the future. But entrepreneurs and CEOs alike will tell you that the kind of job Schmidt took on is not easy. It’s easier to start a new business or project than keep an existing one going. To correct your course when you have already started, when you realize mid-race you’re not heading in the right direction, is more complicated.
So how do you reinvent yourself?
Step 1: Clarify the situation. What has changed that requires a reinvention?
Step 2: Assess your assets
Step 3: Listen for needs.
Step 4: Define your strategy.
Here’s the full story. 
[Image: Flickr user Adam Brill]

fastcompany:

Four Steps To Reinventing Your Career

When it was Eric Schmidt’s turn, he must have done a pretty good job. His efforts were impressive enough to Google cofounders Larry Page and Sergey Brin to convince them he was the CEO to take their company into the future. But entrepreneurs and CEOs alike will tell you that the kind of job Schmidt took on is not easy. It’s easier to start a new business or project than keep an existing one going. To correct your course when you have already started, when you realize mid-race you’re not heading in the right direction, is more complicated.

So how do you reinvent yourself?

Step 1: Clarify the situation. What has changed that requires a reinvention?

Step 2: Assess your assets

Step 3: Listen for needs.

Step 4: Define your strategy.

Here’s the full story. 

[Image: Flickr user Adam Brill]

fastcompany:

Did you finish all those chips at lunch (even though you vowed to only have half)? Here’s why.
The Extraordinary Science of Addictive Junkfood

“So why are the diabetes and obesity and hypertension numbers still spiraling out of control? It’s not just a matter of poor willpower on the part of the consumer and a give-the-people-what-they-want attitude on the part of the food manufacturers. 
What I found, over four years of research and reporting, was a conscious effort — taking place in labs and marketing meetings and grocery-store aisles — to get people hooked on foods that are convenient and inexpensive.”

Check out the full NY Times article here.

fastcompany:

Did you finish all those chips at lunch (even though you vowed to only have half)? Here’s why.

The Extraordinary Science of Addictive Junkfood

“So why are the diabetes and obesity and hypertension numbers still spiraling out of control? It’s not just a matter of poor willpower on the part of the consumer and a give-the-people-what-they-want attitude on the part of the food manufacturers.

What I found, over four years of research and reporting, was a conscious effort — taking place in labs and marketing meetings and grocery-store aisles — to get people hooked on foods that are convenient and inexpensive.”

Check out the full NY Times article here.

fastcompany:

Here’s how one group is trying to steer Valentine’s Day back on course.
Rebranding Valentine’s Day Into A Day Of Generosity

That brings me back to creating a day. I’d always felt that other people might also want and need to reconnect with generosity, but I didn’t know what to do about it. Then, two years later, just three days before Valentine’s Day, Katya Andreesen, Fast Company’s Ellen McGirt and Scott Case and I hatched a plan to create “Generosity Day:” one day for everyone around the world to replicate my generosity experiment, to practice radical generosity.
We decided that Valentine’s Day, just three days away, might be the perfect hook. Valentine’s was a day about love, but that had lost its way. So with just 72 hours and zero budget, we set out to “reboot” Valentine’s Day as Generosity Day: one day for millions of people globally to say “yes,” to engage in small or radical acts of generosity. 

 
 
 
 

fastcompany:

Here’s how one group is trying to steer Valentine’s Day back on course.

Rebranding Valentine’s Day Into A Day Of Generosity

That brings me back to creating a day. I’d always felt that other people might also want and need to reconnect with generosity, but I didn’t know what to do about it. Then, two years later, just three days before Valentine’s Day, Katya Andreesen, Fast Company’s Ellen McGirt and Scott Case and I hatched a plan to create “Generosity Day:” one day for everyone around the world to replicate my generosity experiment, to practice radical generosity.

We decided that Valentine’s Day, just three days away, might be the perfect hook. Valentine’s was a day about love, but that had lost its way. So with just 72 hours and zero budget, we set out to “reboot” Valentine’s Day as Generosity Day: one day for millions of people globally to say “yes,” to engage in small or radical acts of generosity. 

 

 

 

 

Feb 8

deadlift

  • 135 x 10
  • 185 x 7
  • 225 x 5
  • 255 x 3
  • 275 x 1
  • 295 x 1
  • 315 x 1
  • 325 = FAIL. 

12 min AMRAP

  • 10 deadlifts @ 185#
  • 10 box jumps

Total: 5 rounds + 5 deadlifts

Tomorrow = Visit with the shoulder doctor. 2nd look at the torn labrum, torn biceps tendon, slap tear. Surgery may be in the not too distant future.

Feb 6

 Three 10:00 minute intervals on a running clock:

Run 1 mile
Complete as many shoulder press, 115# (75#) as possible with remainder of time.
Run 1 mile
Complete as many push press, 165# (115#) as possible with remainder of time.
Run 1 mile
Complete as many jerks, 205# (135#) as possible with remainder of time.

I used 95# for the shoulder press & got 13 in

I used 115# for the push press & got 3 in

I didn’t make it back in time for any jerks.

Completely tweaked/jacked my neck again. it was about 90% back to normal before the WOD & now I am in constant discomfort bordering on pain.

Friday I go to the shoulder specialist to revisit the slap & labrum tears to see what an ideal course of action is. Hoping he can help with the neck as well. 

Broken = sucks.

Feb 5
fastcompany:

6 Simple Rituals To Reach Your Potential Every Day
This past weekend I had the opportunity to speak with my friend Mike Del Ponte, who resembles the character of Joe. Today he launches a Kickstarter campaign for his company Soma, which aims to revolutionize the water industry using sustainable design. (It’s awesome. Check it out.) Surprised by how cool, calm, and collected Mike was so close to launch, I asked him what his secret is.
“Every day I need physical energy, mental clarity, and emotional balance to tackle everything that comes my way,” Mike said. “Self-care is the secret to performing at the highest level.”
Here are the six simple rituals he uses to perform at his highest, which you too can begin implementing right away:
1. Drink a glass of water when you wake up. Your body loses water while you sleep, so you’re naturally dehydrated in the morning. A glass of water when you wake helps start your day fresh. When do you drink your first glass of water each day?
2. Define your top 3. Every morning Mike asks himself, “What are the top three most important tasks that I will complete today?” He prioritizes his day accordingly and doesn’t sleep until the Top 3 are complete. What’s your “Top 3” today?
3. The 50/10 Rule. Solo-task and do more faster by working in 50/10 increments. Use a timer to work for 50 minutes on only one important task with 10 minute breaks in between. Mike spends his 10 minutes getting away from his desk, going outside, calling friends, meditating, or grabbing a glass of water. What’s your most important task for the next 50 minutes?
4. Move and sweat daily. Regular movement keeps us healthy and alert. It boosts energy and mood, and relieves stress. Most mornings you’ll find Mike in a CrossFit or a yoga class. How will you sweat today?
5. Express gratitude. Gratitude fosters happiness, which is why Mike keeps a gratitude journal. Every morning, he writes out at least five things he’s thankful for. In times of stress, he’ll pause and reflect on 10 things he’s grateful for. What are you grateful for today?
6. Reflect daily. Bring closure to your day through 10 minutes of reflection. Mike asks himself, “What went well?” and “What needs improvement?” So… what went well today? How can you do more of it?
Do you have any other tips or practices? 

fastcompany:

6 Simple Rituals To Reach Your Potential Every Day

This past weekend I had the opportunity to speak with my friend Mike Del Ponte, who resembles the character of Joe. Today he launches a Kickstarter campaign for his company Soma, which aims to revolutionize the water industry using sustainable design. (It’s awesome. Check it out.) Surprised by how cool, calm, and collected Mike was so close to launch, I asked him what his secret is.

“Every day I need physical energy, mental clarity, and emotional balance to tackle everything that comes my way,” Mike said. “Self-care is the secret to performing at the highest level.”

Here are the six simple rituals he uses to perform at his highest, which you too can begin implementing right away:

1. Drink a glass of water when you wake up. Your body loses water while you sleep, so you’re naturally dehydrated in the morning. A glass of water when you wake helps start your day fresh. When do you drink your first glass of water each day?

2. Define your top 3. Every morning Mike asks himself, “What are the top three most important tasks that I will complete today?” He prioritizes his day accordingly and doesn’t sleep until the Top 3 are complete. What’s your “Top 3” today?

3. The 50/10 Rule. Solo-task and do more faster by working in 50/10 increments. Use a timer to work for 50 minutes on only one important task with 10 minute breaks in between. Mike spends his 10 minutes getting away from his desk, going outside, calling friends, meditating, or grabbing a glass of water. What’s your most important task for the next 50 minutes?

4. Move and sweat daily. Regular movement keeps us healthy and alert. It boosts energy and mood, and relieves stress. Most mornings you’ll find Mike in a CrossFit or a yoga class. How will you sweat today?

5. Express gratitude. Gratitude fosters happiness, which is why Mike keeps a gratitude journal. Every morning, he writes out at least five things he’s thankful for. In times of stress, he’ll pause and reflect on 10 things he’s grateful for. What are you grateful for today?

6. Reflect daily. Bring closure to your day through 10 minutes of reflection. Mike asks himself, “What went well?” and “What needs improvement?” So… what went well today? How can you do more of it?

Do you have any other tips or practices? 

Feb 4
fastcompany:

The 5 Questions Every Company Should Ask Itself

IN INTERVIEWING SOME OF THE BIGGEST INNOVATION EXPERTS, INCLUDING CLAYTON CHRISTENSEN AND ERIC RIES, WARREN BERGER FOUND THAT ASKING THE RIGHT QUESTIONS CAN BE MORE CHALLENGING THAN FINDING ANSWERS.

1. WHAT IS OUR COMPANY’S PURPOSE ON THIS EARTH?
Keith Yamashita

To arrive at a powerful sense of purpose, Yamashita says, companies today need “a fundamental orientation that is outward looking”—so they can understand what people out there in the world truly desire and need, and what’s standing in the way. At the same time, business leaders also must look inward, to try to clarify their own core values and larger ambitions.

2. WHAT SHOULD WE STOP DOING?
Jack Bergstrand

But the harder question has to do with what you’re willing to eliminate. If you can’t answer that question, Bergstrand maintains, “it lessens your chances of being successful at what you want to do next—because you’ll be sucking up resources doing what’s no longer needed and taking those resources away from what should be a top priority.”

4. IF WE DIDN’T HAVE AN EXISTING BUSINESS, HOW COULD WE BEST BUILD A NEW ONE?
Clayton Christensen

“…Answering this question can point to future opportunities and help your share price to outperform the market by showing “that there’s more growth here than analysts may have thought.”

4. WHERE IS OUR PETRI DISH?
Tim Ogilvie

Ogilvie’s question is really asking, “Where in the company is it safe to ask radical questions? Where, within the company, can you explore heretical questions that could threaten the business as it is—without contaminating what you’re doing now?”

5. HOW CAN WE MAKE A BETTER EXPERIMENT?
Eric Ries

“This means that instead of asking “What will we do?” or “What will we build?” the emphasis should be on “What will we learn?”

[Image: Sketch via Shuttershock]

fastcompany:

The 5 Questions Every Company Should Ask Itself

IN INTERVIEWING SOME OF THE BIGGEST INNOVATION EXPERTS, INCLUDING CLAYTON CHRISTENSEN AND ERIC RIES, WARREN BERGER FOUND THAT ASKING THE RIGHT QUESTIONS CAN BE MORE CHALLENGING THAN FINDING ANSWERS.

1. WHAT IS OUR COMPANY’S PURPOSE ON THIS EARTH?

Keith Yamashita

To arrive at a powerful sense of purpose, Yamashita says, companies today need “a fundamental orientation that is outward looking”—so they can understand what people out there in the world truly desire and need, and what’s standing in the way. At the same time, business leaders also must look inward, to try to clarify their own core values and larger ambitions.

2. WHAT SHOULD WE STOP DOING?

Jack Bergstrand

But the harder question has to do with what you’re willing to eliminate. If you can’t answer that question, Bergstrand maintains, “it lessens your chances of being successful at what you want to do next—because you’ll be sucking up resources doing what’s no longer needed and taking those resources away from what should be a top priority.”

4. IF WE DIDN’T HAVE AN EXISTING BUSINESS, HOW COULD WE BEST BUILD A NEW ONE?

Clayton Christensen

“…Answering this question can point to future opportunities and help your share price to outperform the market by showing “that there’s more growth here than analysts may have thought.”

4. WHERE IS OUR PETRI DISH?

Tim Ogilvie

Ogilvie’s question is really asking, “Where in the company is it safe to ask radical questions? Where, within the company, can you explore heretical questions that could threaten the business as it is—without contaminating what you’re doing now?”

5. HOW CAN WE MAKE A BETTER EXPERIMENT?

Eric Ries

“This means that instead of asking “What will we do?” or “What will we build?” the emphasis should be on “What will we learn?”

[Image: Sketch via Shuttershock]

Feb 3

somewhere between 5 - 6 mile “run” (so slow) and then best super bowl food ever! pork wings, ribs, crazy chicken!

Feb 2

A Map of the Internet Universe

fastcompany:

Check out this interactive map of the internet universe!

image